The Race of Toad and Deer

The Race of Toad and Deer The Race of Toad and Deer Spanish
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The Race of Toad and Deer Korean cover

Also available in Korean, published by Glendoman, 8951720934.

Cover of original edition, Orchard Books:

The Race of Toad and Deer original cover
20th anniversary 2015

The Race of Toad and Deer
Groundwood Books, illustrated by Domi

La carrera del sapo y el venado

In this second book by the Latina pair, Pat Mora has created a poetic adaptation of the Maya version of the much-loved fable of the tortoise and the hare. The arrogant deer who boasts of his strength and speed is finally challenged to a race by the wily toad. While all the wondrous animals of the jungle - jaguar, tapir, armadillo and toucan - gathered around to watch, the toad makes a plan. He may not be as large as Venado, but he is very clever and has many friends to help him.

In the end, Sapo defeats the deer, proving the value of brain over brawn. This version of the story was passed down by Don Fernado Tesucun, a Maya-Itzaj man who worked on the excavations of the ruins of Tikal.

The rich and beautiful collaboration between Pat Mora and Domi perfectly exemplifies the value of artists' retelling of stories from their own cultures.
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Highlighted Reviews
"In a bragging session, Tío Sapo, or Uncle Toad, disputes the supremacy of Venado, the largest deer in the jungle. A race is quickly arranged, but just before it begins, the consummate trickster Sapo and the other toads in the jungle hatch a plot … Mora … creates a slyly humorous text sprinkled with Spanish phrases."—Kirkus Reviews

"In this Guatemalan variation of the tortoise-and-hare fable, the laurels go not to virtuous persistence but to crafty teamwork. Lightly peppered with Spanish expressions, the text is organically bicultural."—Publishers Weekly

“In this delightful retelling of a Maya myth, readers can appreciate the elements of other universal folktales, such as the trickster and the tortoise and the hare … This truly beautiful book is appropriate for all collections and bookstores, and is a brilliant selection for story time. Highly recommended.”—Starred review, Críticas